Tag Archives: Mikati

Open letter to M. Mikati, by Lina Murr Nehme

I published this open letter on 16 July 2012. The present tragedy in Tripoli and the declarations of Mikati make it necessary to publish it again. For the man who is leading now the battle against the Lebanese army in Tripoli is that same Shadi Mawlawi who was freed two years ago, in a way that was both unbelievable and unacceptable:

M. Prime Minister

A few weeks ago, Shadi Mawlawi was arrested in a building that belongs to Minister Safadi. Because of that, the Salafis inflicted their war on Tripoli, your city.

It is the judiciary’s business to say if the charges against Mawlawi are true or not. It is not mine. However, I have the right to refuse to believe that a man is innocent, when, with his consent, his friends free him from prison by putting his city at war, killing five persons, and wounding many others. A man who has nothing to do with crime, does not thank his friends because they killed innocent people for his sake. By doing that, he becomes their accomplice and bears the responsibility of their murders.

The judiciary freed him because of pressures laid by you, M. Mikati, and by M. Muhammad Safadi.

Both of you are very rich men. Each of you fears the loss of some of his wealth. Each of you prepares for the coming elections. I understand all that. But it is my duty to tell you the truth, however rich you are, however close the elections are. It is not honorable for a Lebanese Prime minister, to protect the murderers of innocent people, at the expense of security, of the Army, and of the citizens of Tripoli. Your duty is to punish these murderers and to impose law and order. This is the desire of the silent majority in Tripoli. And Tripoli is the second city of Lebanon. It deserves peace like Beirut, M. Prime Minister.

Lebanese Army Tripoli

You were not content with protecting murderers by laying pressure on the Judiciary in order to free Shadi Mawlawi. You weakened the State’s authority even more, by opposing the Lebanese Army to the Lebanese Security Forces in Tripoli. So Mawlawi could say that “the Lebanese State cannot afford not to please the Sunnis”, as if the honorable community to which he belongs was superior to the other Lebanese communities.

The ministers rushed to the Tribunal, each one offering Shadi Mawlawi the service of his car. Thus rush the taxi chauffeurs at the airport, when they see a traveler.

Safadi won the contest. Mawlawi used his ministerial car, which transported him to Tripoli.

Shadi Mawlawi free

Your car, M. Prime minister, was refused. But you had Mawlawi visit you at your home. We read in some newspapers that you offered him ten thousand dollars. However, your office denied it afterwards.
True or false, the matter would have caused you much harm, if it had become the talk of the town.

Then came the time of the annual commemoration of the massacre of Halba. The massacre of Halba cannot be explained in confessional terms, because both the murderers and the victims were of the same religion (Sunni). The Salafis, however, decided to organize another celebration in a nearby place.

The Army was sent to prevent people from bringing guns, in order to protect every person who would participate in one of the two celebrations.

As we all know, when the Army is sent to make a roadblock, it receives the order to fire on the tires of every car whose driver refuses to stop. And the Army is supposed to fire on the people that are inside if they go on their way or if they charge the soldiers.

In Kueikhat, a two car convoy passed. One of these cars contained a great number of guns in its trunk. And its driver did not stop when the soldiers ordered him to. The occupants of the car even fired at the soldiers, and wounded one of them. The soldiers fired back, and killed two Salafi ulamas. One of them was Sheik Ahmad Abdul-Wahid, who is well known for having smuggled arms in order to help the Fatah al-Islam (an al-Qaida Palestinian organization) against the Lebanese Army in the battle of Nahr al-Bared.

Sheikh Abdel Wahed

The photos of the wounded Lebanese soldier were not communicated to the press. Why? Because they would have proved that the Army did its duty, and that the soldiers were shot at before shooting?

Pressure laid by the rabble, and also by you, M. Prime Minister, led to the arrest of the soldiers and officers who obeyed orders.
The Army did not do anything to defend them. Why? Maybe for fear of some politicians who draw their strength and their financing from serving foreign powers. But the Lebanese military also are in need of security. Security when they obey orders. If these orders were bad, you should have punished those who gave them, not those who obeyed.

Thus you freed the man charged with crime, and threw in jail those who obeyed orders. After that, M. Mikati, you decided to free the Salafists who were arrested because of the Nahr al-Barid events. To justify the interest you and the Minister of the Interior had in freeing them — and not the others — it was said that they had been in jail for five years.

Mikati_Tripoli

We want the law to be implemented. We want people to be freed after having been arrested for a time, if they have not been judged. But why should you free the Salafist Moslems and not the Moslems who are not Salafist? Why should you free the Salafist Moslems and not the people belonging to other communities? Indeed, in the prison of Roumieh, there are men who have been waiting for seven years or more, and they still have not been judged. Among them, some have been arrested for stealing 100.000 Lebanese pounds only ($75) and not because they belong to a terrorist organization that has killed Lebanese civilians and soldiers.

A few days later, the First Military Investigation Magistrate, Riad Abou Ghida, freed the military officers who had been arrested after the death of Sheikh Ahmad Abdul-Wahid and his companion. Then the Salafists threatened to blow up Tripoli and the North. Then you intervened, you, M. Prime Minister who never cease to fear for your electoral popularity in Tripoli, and for your billions of dollars invested in the Saudi Arabian Kingdom. And the First Military Investigation Magistrate arrested again the military officers.
In no other country is such a tyrannical act allowed, M. Mikati. Its purpose is to ruin the Army morale so that it stops defending the country. So Lebanon becomes defenseless when time comes to transform it into… into what? Perhaps into that Salafist Islamic Republic claimed by those who demonstrated against the liberation of the military officers.

It would have been less harmful to the State’s reputation, not to have freed the military officers at all.

Now, the majority of all religions in Lebanon, is angry.  But will you listen to its voice, to the voice of conscience more than to the voice of the minority that burns tires and kills the innocent?

M. Mikati, do you rule over the Republic of Al Capone, which defends murderers and abandons the innocent majority?

Lina Murr Nehme

This open letter was published by Elnashra, on 16 July 2012. Safadi answered me, through the same media. He did not deny anything I had written, he only said that Shadi Mawlawi did not use his car to go to Tripoli. But I ask Safadi why he did not contradict the television reporters at that time, when they were saying, live, that Mawlawi used his car?

Email Twitter Facebook Pinterest Google+ Linkedin

Lettre ouverte à M. Mikati, par Lina Murr Nehmé

En juillet 2012, les événements accompagnant la libération de Chadi Mawlawi étaient tellement scandaleux que j’ai alors publié une lettre ouverte au Premier ministre de l’époque, Nagib Mikati.
La tragédie qui se déroule en ce moment à Tripoli, et les déclarations de Mikati me poussent à la publier de nouveau.
Car l’homme qui vient de diriger la bataille contre l’Armée libanaise à Tripoli est ce même Chadi Mawlawi qui avait été libéré deux ans plus tôt, de façon à la fois incroyable et inacceptable:

Monsieur le Premier Ministre

Il y a quelques semaines, Chadi Mawlawi fut arrêté dans un immeuble appartenant au ministre Safadi. Les salafistes, outrés, mirent votre ville, Tripoli, à feu et à sang.

Ce n’est pas à moi, c’est au corps judiciaire de dire si les accusations contre Mawlawi sont fondées. Cependant, j’ai le droit de refuser de croire qu’un homme est innocent quand il consent à ce que ses amis le libèrent de prison en plongeant sa ville dans la guerre, tuant cinq personnes, et en blessant beaucoup d’autres. Un homme qui n’a rien à voir avec le crime, ne remercie pas ses amis parce qu’ils ont tué des innocents pour le servir. Car cela fait de lui leur complice et lui fait porter la responsabilité de leurs meurtres.

Le corps judiciaire a libéré Chadi Mawlawi à cause de pressions venant de vous, M. Mikati, et de M. Muhammad Safadi. Vous êtes, tous deux, des hommes très riches. Chacun de vous craint de perdre une partie de sa fortune. Chacun de vous prépare  les élections. Je peux comprendre tout cela. Mais mon devoir est de vous dire la vérité, aussi riches que vous soyez, aussi proches que les élections soient. Il n’est pas à l’honneur d’un Premier ministre libanais de fortifier les assassins des innocents, aux dépens de la sécurité publique, de l’Armée libanaise, et des citoyens de Tripoli. Votre devoir est de punir ces meurtriers et d’imposer la loi et l’ordre, comme le désire la majorité silencieuse à Tripoli. Et Tripoli est la seconde ville du Liban. Elle mérite la paix comme Beyrouth, monsieur le Premier ministre.

Lebanese Army Tripoli

Et vous ne vous êtes pas contenté de protéger des assassins en faisant pression sur le corps judiciaire afin de libérer Chadi Mawlawi. Vous avez encore plus affaibli l’autorité de l’Etat en opposant, à Tripoli, l’Armée libanaise aux Forces de Sécurité libanaises. Mawlawi put donc dire que “L’Etat libanais ne peut se permettre de ne pas plaire aux sunnites”, comme si l’honorable communauté à laquelle il appartient était supérieure aux autres communautés libanaises.

Et les ministres de se précipiter à la porte du tribunal, et chacun d’eux d’offrir à Chadi Mawlawi les services de sa voiture. C’est ainsi que se précipitent les chauffeurs de taxi à l’aéroport, quand ils voient un voyageur.

Safadi gagna: c’est sa voiture ministérielle que Mawlawi élut pour se transporter à Tripoli.

Shadi Mawlawi free

Votre voiture, monsieur le Premier ministre, fut refusée. Mais vous avez reçu Mawlawi à votre domicile. Nous avons lu dans certains journaux que vous lui avez offert 10.000 dollars. Votre bureau a démenti l’information par la suite : vraie ou fausse, elle vous aurait fait beaucoup de tort, si elle avait circulé en ville.

Et vint le temps de la commémoration annuelle du massacre de Halba. Le massacre de Halba ne peut pas être expliqué de façon confessionnelle, car les assassins et les victimes étaient tous sunnites. Mais les salafistes décidèrent d’organiser une autre cérémonie dans un endroit non loin de là. L’armée fut donc envoyée pour empêcher les hommes d’apporter des fusils, afin de protéger toute personne voulant participer à une des deux cérémonies.

Nous savons tous que, quand l’Armée est envoyée dresser un barrage sur la route, elle reçoit l’ordre de tirer sur les pneus de tout véhicule dont le conducteur refuse d’arrêter son moteur. Et de tirer sur les occupants dudit véhicule, si, malgré les pneus crevés, ils continuent à circuler ou tirent sur les soldats.

Un convoi de deux voitures passa devant le barrage dressé par l’Armée à Koueikhate. Le coffre arrière d’une de ces automobiles contenait un grand nombre de fusils, et son conducteur ne s’arrêta pas quand les soldats lui en donnèrent l’ordre. Les occupants de la voiture tirèrent sur les soldats, et en blessèrent un. Les autres soldats ripostèrent et tuèrent les deux oulémas salafistes. L’un d’eux était le cheikh Ahmad Abdul-Wahed, célèbre parce qu’il avait fait passer en contrebande des armes pour le Fatah al-Islam (organisation palestinienne relevant d’al-Qaïda) alors en guerre contre l’Armée libanaise à Nahr al-Bared.

Sheikh Abdel Wahed

Les photos du soldat libanais blessé n’ont pas été communiquées à la presse. Pourquoi? Parce qu’elles auraient prouvé que l’armée a fait son devoir, et qu’on lui a tiré dessus avant qu’elle ne tire?

Des pressions ont alors été exercées par la populace dans la rue, et par vous aussi, monsieur le Premier ministre. Et les militaires qui avaient obéi aux ordres, furent arrêtés.

L’Armée ne fit rien pour les défendre. Pourquoi ? Peut-être par peur de certains politiciens dont la puissance et le financement viennent de pays étrangers. Mais les militaires libanais aussi ont besoin de sécurité. Sécurité quand ils obéissent aux ordres. Si ces ordres étaient mauvais, il fallait punir ceux qui les avaient donnés, pas ceux qui les avaient exécutés.

Ainsi, vous avez libéré l’homme inculpé pour crime, et jeté en prison ceux qui avaient obéi aux ordres. Après cela, monsieur Mikati, vous avez décidé de libérer les salafistes qui avaient été arrêtés après les événements de Nahr el-Bared.

Pour justifier l’intérêt que vous et le ministre de l’Intérieur portiez à ces prisonniers et non aux autres, on a dit qu’ils avaient été en prison durant cinq ans.

Mikati_Tripoli

Nous voulons que la loi soit appliquée. Nous voulons que les inculpés soient libérés après une certaine période, s’ils n’ont pas été jugés. Mais pourquoi voudriez-vous libérer les musulmans salafistes et non les musulmans qui ne sont pas salafistes ? Pourquoi libérer les musulmans salafistes et non les hommes appartenant aux autres communautés ? Dans cette même prison of Roumieh, il y a des hommes qui attendent depuis sept ans, et ils n’ont pas encore été jugés. Parmi eux, certains ont été arrêtés pour avoir volé 100.000 livres libanaises seulement (50 €) et non parce qu’ils appartiennent à une organisation terroriste qui a tué des civils et des militaires libanais.

Quelques jours plus tard, le Premier Juge d’Instruction militaire, Riad Abou Ghida, libéra les officiers qui avaient été arrêtés après la mort du cheikh Ahmad Abdul-Wahed et son compagnon. Alors les salafistes menacèrent de mettre de nouveau à feu et à sang Tripoli et le Nord. Alors vous êtes intervenu, vous, monsieur le Premier ministre qui ne cessez de craindre pour votre popularité électorale à Tripoli, et pour vos milliards de dollars investis en Arabie Saoudite. Et le Premier Juge d’Instruction militaire arrêta de nouveau les officiers.

Aucun pays ne peut tolérer un acte aussi tyrannique, monsieur Mikati. Son but est de ruiner le moral de l’Armée pour qu’elle cesse de protéger le pays. Ainsi, le Liban devient sans défense quand vient le temps de le transformer en… en quoi ? Peut-être en cette République islamique salafiste que réclament la plupart de ceux qui ont manifesté contre la libération des officiers.

Il aurait été moins nuisible pour la réputation de l’Etat, de ne pas libérer les officiers du tout.

Maintenant, la majorité au Liban, toutes religions confondues, est en colère. Mais écouterez-vous sa voix, la voix de la conscience, davantage que celle de la minorité qui brûle des pneus et tue des innocents?

Monsieur Mikati, régnez-vous sur la République d’Al Capone, qui défendait les assassins et abandonnait la majorité innocente?

 Lina Murr Nehmé

Cette lettre ouverte fut publiée par Elnashra, le 16 juillet 2012. Safadi me répondit par le biais du même média. Il ne démentit rien de ce que j’avais écrit, excepté ceci: selon lui, Chadi Mawlawi n’aurait pas utilisé sa voiture pour aller à Tripoli.
Dans ce cas, pourquoi Safadi n’a-t-il pas contredit les reporters des télévisions qui avaient retransmis en direct la libération de Mawlawi, et avaient dit que Mawlawi avait utilisé sa voiture?

Email Twitter Facebook Pinterest Google+ Linkedin